Rare ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse – in pictures

‘Ring of fire’ eclipses occur every year or two, however they are only visible from a narrow band of Earth each time and it can be decades before the same pattern is repeated.The moon starts to move in front of the sun, as seen from Wan Twin in central Myanmar Photograph: Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images
The next annual eclipse in June 2020 will be visible to a narrow band from Africa to northern Asia.The moon begins to cover the sun, as seen in Bangkok Photograph: Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images
Children uses eclipse glasses to watch a rare solar eclipse central Myanmar Photograph: Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images
A view of the partial solar eclipse, in Sanaa, Yemen Photograph: Yahya Arhab/EPA
School students use DIY solar eclipse viewing equipment to view a rare ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse at a school in Mumbai Photograph: Indranil Mukherjee/AFP via Getty Images
A bird flies past as the moon moves in front of the sun, in Bangkok Photograph: Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP via Getty Images
A girl watches a solar eclipse through a foot X-ray as the moon covers the sun in a rare ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse as seen from Islamabad Photograph: Aamir Qureshi/AFP via Getty Images
The near total ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse as seen from the south Indian city of Dindigul in Tamil Nadu Photograph: Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images
People watch the last solar eclipse of the year in Manama, Bahrain Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
The eclipse as seen from Bahrain Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
A child watches the moon move in front of the sun in Banda Aceh Photograph: Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP via Getty Images

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