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The Amazing Sport of Archery: What to Know Before You Pick Up a Bow

Maybe it’s because the sport has been featured in a handful of popular movies over the last decade (one of them rhymes with “The Hunger Gmes”), or maybe you are looking to become the next Robin Hood. Whatever the reason, millions of people have taken up archery in recent years. 

If you fancy picking up a bow and arrow and discovering your inner Katniss, look no further. TKN reporter Tyler fills us in on NASP – the National Archery in the Schools Program. It first started in Kentucky and has now spread nationwide; giving more than 3 million kids the opportunity to enjoy the shooting sport. To learn more Watch our full report above.🎬🖕

Here are a few things you didn’t know about Archery

1. OLYMPIC ARCHERS ONCE ARROWED PIGEONS.2

At least that’s what John Bantleman of Business 2 Community said. Perhaps he was confused. According to World Archery, the sport’s international governing body, when archery was introduced to the Olympics in 1900, archers competed in the popinjay competition. The object was to shoot a “bird” from atop a pole. The bird, however, was simply a plastic tube with feathers. Not a real bird.

Shotgunners, however, did shoot live pigeons in the Paris 1900 Games.

Archery was first included in the Olympic Games in 1900. This photo was taken eight years later at the London Games. Photo Credit: The Guardian

Archery was first included in the Olympic Games in 1900. This photo was taken eight years later at the London Games. Photo Credit: The Guardian

2. ASIDE FROM THE OCCASIONAL BIRD CATASTROPHE (KIDDING!), ARCHERY IS ONE OF THE SAFEST SPORTS.

According to the National Safety Council (it does exist), archery is more than three times safer than golf, with just one injury for every 2,000 participants. USA Archery reports that the sport is even safer than bowling. 🙄

3. ARROWS IN COMPETITION FLY 2.5 TIMES FASTER THAN A SPRINTING CHEETAH.

But seriously. According to the Telegraph, an arrow released in competition flies 150 mph. The world’s fastest cheetah maxes out at about 60 mph. 😺

4. FROM THE SHOOTING LINE, THE OLYMPIC BULL’S-EYE APPEARS AS SMALL AS A THUMBTACK HELD AT ARM’S LENGTH.

The innermost circle on an Olympic-style 10-ring target measures about 12.2 centimeters across. That’s roughly the size of a CD or grapefruit. Now add three-quarters of a football field between you and the target. Oh yeah: You can’t use any sort of magnification. How’s it look now? Pretty danged small! Yet somehow they make it look so easy.

Ellison was all about the celebration when Team USA scored its place in the gold medal final at London 2012. Photo Credit: Paul Gilham/Getty Images Europe

Ellison was all about the celebration when Team USA scored its place in the gold medal final at London 2012. Photo Credit: Paul Gilham/Getty Images Europe.

5. IF YOU LOVE BOWS AND ARROWS, YOU’RE A TOXOPHILITE.

It’s a funny-sounding word, but it’s legitimate. “Toxophilite” originates from Greek “toxon” for “bow and arrow” and “philos” for “loving.”

6. KING HENRY V MUST HAVE BEEN A TOXOPHILITE.

According to Slate, King Henry V ordered 500,000 arrows for his army in 1421. The arrows were stored in the Tower of London under the watchful eye of the appointed “keeper of the king’s arrows.”

Slate reports that arrows were fletched with goose feathers in King Henry’s days. Archers today use feathers or plastic vanes. It just depends on your personal style and how you want to express yourself.

Photo Credit: World Archery

Photo Credit: World Archery

7. ARCHERY “DISAPPEARED” FROM THE OLYMPICS FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS.

Can you believe it? How did the sport go from absent to most-watched? As mentioned earlier, archery was introduced to the Olympics in 1900. It was then dropped in 1920 because it lacked international uniformity in rules and equipment. Enter World Archery, formerly called the International Archery Federation.

Archery returned in the 1972 Games, and has been a staple since.

8. ARCHERY WAS THE FIRST OLYMPIC SPORT TO ALLOW FEMALE COMPETITORS.

It’s true! In fact, the Olympic Games can be traced to 776 B.C., but they didn’t allow women to compete until the 1904 Games. It’s a good thing times change. Can you imagine the Olympics without female archers like Mackenzie Brown and Khatuna Lorig?

Khatuna Lorig is a six-time Olympian and a Team USA Olympic hopeful. She trained Jennifer Lawrence for her role as Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games.” Photo Credit: Lisa Donato

Khatuna Lorig is a five-time Olympian and a Team USA Olympic hopeful for the Rio 2016 Games. She trained Jennifer Lawrence for her role as Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games.” Photo Credit: Lisa Donato

Fore more information about NASP 👉 Click Here

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